ENCAUSTIC
Encaustic is one of world’s oldest and versatile art mediums. Egyptian Fayum mummy portraits (100-300 CE) utilize the ENCAUSTIC medium, displaying a prominent place in its history. The process involves painting with pigment, wax and heat. Encaustic paint is made from pure pigment mixed with molten waxes and damar resin. The mixture is applied hot with a variety of tools to a surface. During cooling, tools can be used to shape, scrape or incise. Heated tools are used to manipulate the wax mixture during or after the cooling process. Surfaces can be dimensional or smoothly polished. The molten nature of the medium lends itself to collage embellishments and working into layers of veil-like wax.

 

INTAGLIO
Dating from the Middle Ages, INTAGLIO (from the Italian, "to incise") describes a family of printmaking processes, all of which involve a plate (usually metal) which has an image below its surface. The intaglio water etching technique facilitates the opportunity to create impressions without the use of traditional acids and etching grounds. The positive lines or pits are inked, the negative surface area is wiped clean, and the plate is placed face-up on the press bed. Archival paper is placed atop the plate, cushioned with felt blankets, and rolled between the press cylinders under pressure. Intaglio printmaking includes engraving, etching, dry-point, aquatint, soft-ground etching, lift-ground etching, photo-etching, and gravure.

 

MONOTYPE
The first artist in recorded history to create the MONOTYPE was the 17th century Italian artist, Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione. The process facilitates a unique combination of printmaking, painting and drawing mediums. An image is drawn, painted or collaged directly onto a plate using oil and/or water based mediums. Printmaking paper is placed over the image and either transferred by hand, or passed through a printmaking press. Pressure transfers the image onto the paper to produce only one single unique print, an edition of one ( 1/1).

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The Process

ENCAUSTIC
Encaustic is one of world’s oldest and versatile art mediums. Egyptian Fayum mummy portraits (100-300 CE) utilize the ENCAUSTIC medium, displaying a prominent place in its history. The process involves painting with pigment, wax and heat. Encaustic paint is made from pure pigment mixed with molten waxes and damar resin. The mixture is applied hot with a variety of tools to a surface. During cooling, tools can be used to shape, scrape or incise. Heated tools are used to manipulate the wax mixture during or after the cooling process. Surfaces can be dimensional or smoothly polished. The molten nature of the medium lends itself to collage embellishments and working into layers of veil-like wax.

 

INTAGLIO
Dating from the Middle Ages, INTAGLIO (from the Italian, "to incise") describes a family of printmaking processes, all of which involve a plate (usually metal) which has an image below its surface. The intaglio water etching technique facilitates the opportunity to create impressions without the use of traditional acids and etching grounds. The positive lines or pits are inked, the negative surface area is wiped clean, and the plate is placed face-up on the press bed. Archival paper is placed atop the plate, cushioned with felt blankets, and rolled between the press cylinders under pressure. Intaglio printmaking includes engraving, etching, dry-point, aquatint, soft-ground etching, lift-ground etching, photo-etching, and gravure.

 

MONOTYPE
The first artist in recorded history to create the MONOTYPE was the 17th century Italian artist, Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione. The process facilitates a unique combination of printmaking, painting and drawing mediums. An image is drawn, painted or collaged directly onto a plate using oil and/or water based mediums. Printmaking paper is placed over the image and either transferred by hand, or passed through a printmaking press. Pressure transfers the image onto the paper to produce only one single unique print, an edition of one ( 1/1).

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